Thoughts on Open Source

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Unbelievable sunsets in Tucson, AZ

I recently read an article on Linux.com by Esther Shein titled “The Case for Open Source Software at Work” where she discusses the results of a survey on the use of Open Source software in companies. Pretty interesting read and it makes the argument that IT workers feel about the importance for having source code.

The elephant in the room that is never presented is how the value is measured by accounting or say purchasing. For example, how much perceived value is derived by other parts of the company because they look at the software as being free… i.e. cost free?

Individuals are different in their purchasing and use habits. Most individuals I know are driven by price as the first factor and popularity and completeness as other factors in their consideration.

I can’t recall ever seeing a survey of corporate types that measure the desire for specific software where free vs open source code is derived. I imagine that it may be measured internally by some companies but I would love to see a public survey that addresses that issue.

My own opinion, derived from looking at MS Office vs Libre Office is that quality and support is the most important driver for desktop office software. Every large company that I have consulted with use MS Office. They may use an older version but they use MS Office.

When I switch my thoughts to analytical software, I see the same thing. Corporations purchase or license software like WPS or SAS because of support and completeness. Documentation is also a big factor here too. Individuals who don’t have the financial resources to license analytical software like the aforementioned products gravitate towards free software.

I do grudgingly use R when needed but I prefer WPS over any other analytical software. It’s based on a language that I have used for 30 years and feel very comfortable with. I find it much easier to debug my code and like that if I chose to build a product, I know it will run on Windows, OS X, Linux and the mainframe.

When I factor in that I can license WPS for a bit over $3 a day on a Windows or Mac workstation (and our competitor charges just north of $41 a day for your first year) I find it compelling to have WPS in my BI stack. I can still use R and Python but the language of SAS is just too rich and broad to ignore.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in beautiful Tucson, Arizona. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS consulting and contract programming services and is an authorized reseller of WPS in North America.