Tag Archives: SAS License Fees

SAS Increases Prices for Workstation Product

Just noticed that SAS raised their prices for desktops. The 2014 price for a single workstation was $8700 for the first year and has increased to $9,000. This is for the Analytics Pro product and only available on Windows Workstations. Note that SAS does not sell workstation licenses for Apple’s OS X operating system because it doesn’t support OS X natively. SAS also increased the license fees for individual access engines from $3,000 to $3,100 USD.

The $9,000 price also does not include any Access Engines used to interface into databases such as Oracle, MySQL, DB2, etc…

The price increase is 3.44% and when you factor in annual inflation for 2014 (.76%) it seems rather odd that they would have an increase. Actually, by the time you get done adding two access engines (say ODBC and one other) you are looking at first year fees of $15,200. That’s a lot of money!

Our product pricing for 2015 for the WPS Workstation product here in the US has held steady. There are many reasons for this including currency issues and obtaining scales of economy are some of the reasons behind this. Remember, I’m only referring to US pricing.

If you are interested in what WPS has to offer in v3.1 on Windows and Mac Workstations, take a look at the document WPS for Workstations v3.1 to see what a bang for the buck that WPS is for any organization.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

2013 WPS and SAS Server Pricing Comparison

It’s that time of the year again. We’ve updated our ever popular WPS vs. SAS Pricing Comparison document for 2013. As in previous years, we pulled data for SAS pricing from the GSA schedule. As most of you who have read previous years pricing comparisons, WPS continues to stay significantly less expensive than our competitor.

The pricing differential for even our most entry level server product in contrast with our competitor is stunning. For example, with the money you can save in the very first year in licensing WPS over SAS on just a two core server, you could:

  • Buy 5 Kia Souls.
  • Pay for food for a family of four for 7.5 years.
  • Will buy four years of in-state tuition and room and board at Ohio State University.
  • Buys 27 years worth of gasoline for the average U.S family.
  • You could add an employee to your company.
  • Buys 24 months of a high end vacation rental home that has a Jacuzzi and lap pool.

OK, you get the point! Click the following link for the updated “Pricing Comparison Document” in PDF format.

Note: We no longer provide the pricing comparison document due to the time and complexity of pulling our competitors pricing data.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

Sweating a River over SAS Pricing

On my way out of a local technology meet up last night, I noticed a guy sitting in the car next to mine and he was looking highly distressed. Actually, he looked like a guy who was just served some divorce papers and was desperate for some booze.

Now normally, I mind my own business but his car window was down and the guy looked like he was getting ready to cry.

“Hey friend, how are you doing? Are you alright?”

He spun his head around, not realizing that I was standing next to his car and was caught off guard by my presence. He seemed out of sorts and his eyes were bloodshot, as if he had been crying.

“Have you seen the latest SAS license fees…” he was muttering, “the latest SAS license fees…”

Until then, I hadn’t noticed the jacket he was wearing had the logo of a large company that provides processing services and reporting to other business customers.

“You’re talking about being labeled as a Data Service Provider by SAS Institute, aren’t you?” I couldn’t get my words out before he interrupted.

“They want to quadruple my annual license fees… QUADRUPLE! Don’t they know there’s a recession going on?”

I took a few steps back, “Well yeah, they are known for doing this…”

“They want me to provide them with a list of all my customers so they can try to sell SAS products and services directly to them…”

I tried to tell him that there are alternatives to using SAS, like WPS which is pretty much a drop-in replacement for what he was doing, but before I could get the entire sentence out, he interjected…

“The SAS people also told me that if any of their existing customers drop SAS software because of the business services we provide, then our company will have to cover their license shortfall.”

He started whimpering.

“They’re saying that my business is also in competition to a market they want to really expand services to in the future…”

He slumped forward and started whimpering again. I looked around to see if anyone else was watching and would offer some comfort. I reached through the car window and put my hand on his shoulder, a little fearful that he might try to grab my arm and bite me. I did my best to console him.

“WPS, man… your best solution to regain control from the beast is WPS. No crazy DSP fees or flakey pricing.”

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest, LLC. and has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and a reseller of WPS in North America.