Tag Archives: WPS

The Application Economy

I pretty much finished up my Christmas shopping two weeks early this year. Even the wrapping and delivery completed thanks to Amazon this year. I’ve never had my shopping done so early in December and I’m darn happy about that!

That gave me time to watch some TV this weekend and since much of College Football is over for the season I ended up cruising over to Bloomberg TV. I watched a program called “Hello World” on the Russian Tech scene and it was fascinating to learn about what was being created in Russia.

The sponsor of the show was CA (aka Computer Associates) and they had an interesting and entertaining commercial titled “The Front Porch” which is about the Application Economy. We as analytical developers rarely think about software as an application the same way as consumers do. Our customers are often different departments or divisions in the corporation we work at. We don’t work at creating an application product that meets the needs of tens-of-thousands of users, or even millions. We mostly develop products used for tens of people or if we are lucky, hundreds.

A lot of the reason for that is that many of us don’t see what we do as developing an application that is consumed by users outside of our organization. The cost of commercial software is often so high that it makes it cost prohibitive to invest the hundreds of hours needed to create the application. The other issue many run into is the availability of data that can meet the needs of the consumer and is not protected by agreements.

The market has responded with software such as Python and R. However, the problem with both is the amount of data that can be processed. We live in a Big Data world and expecting data to fit into available memory is often not practical. Many of us are also dependent on using the Language of SAS for processing and displaying of data.

Obviously, WPS is a better choice than SAS when it compares to pricing, especially on the desktop. If you create an application that requires, say, WPS on a workstation, it is much easier to make a sale (your application and a WPS license) when the first-year cost is one-tenth the cost of the SAS system.

In future articles, I want to touch on creating applications for resale using WPS. I want to talk about “applications” for such things as Smart Cities, Marketing, Credit Scoring and Fraud Analytics.

We truly live in an era where we as analysts and statistical developers can contribute our skills starting a business, providing a product and doing it all with minimal cash outlay. The internet is a money pipe into the home and business. Don’t let the opportunity pass you by.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in beautiful Tucson Arizona. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS consulting and contract programming services and is an authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

Introducing WPS Express

Today, World Programming LTD announced the availability of WPS Express. WPS Express is a product for those interested in learning the Language of SAS. WPS Express comes with all the database drivers and other modules of the Standard desktop version of WPS.

What separates WPS Express from the Standard Edition desktop experience is the number of records that can be processed. Currently, WPS Express processes 100 records.

What WPS Express is meant be is a free product that allows you to learn the Language of SAS. As such, 100 records are probably sufficient to learn to program in the language, connect to many different databases, and run R.

One other caveat is that WPS Express is licensed to an individual and not to any organization. Again, it’s worth noting that this is a product to learn how to write code in the Language of SAS. Also, WPS Express is licensed on an annual basis so you will have to renew your license every year.

You can find WPS Express by going to the World Programming website and taking a look at: https://www.worldprogramming.com/try-or-buy/wps/editions/express

If you are interested in a more formal WPS training, especially on how to use the WPS Workbench, I recommend that you reach out to Art Tabachneck. Art has a placement company called Analyst Finder that helps companies and recruiters find analytical talent. Art also has a one-day training seminar and he can do the training online. I’ve seen the syllabus and slide deck and think it’s quite complete with regards to getting a thorough understanding of the power of WPS. Interested parties can reach out to Art at: art297@rogers.com

WPS Express, due to its 100 record limitations is not a practical product to use for evaluating whether to swap out SAS for WPS. Every organization would need the standard edition to process an unlimited number of records so that they could compare output of the products.

MineQuest Business Analytics is able and willing to help you and your organization with your evaluation of WPS. We can arrange for a free 30-day evaluation of the workstation products, both OS X and Windows as well as on all supported server platforms.

Interested in a quote or a free 30-day evaluation of the standard edition of WPS? If your organization is located in North America, simply fill out the Evaluation Request from our website.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in beautiful Tucson Arizona. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is an authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

CleanWork for Windows

Recently, we decided to go back through some of our older programs and take a look at them and see if they could be updated and/or made open source. We wrote Cleanwork years ago and we often provided it to organizations that used our consulting services as a freebie and a way to say “Thank You.”

CleanWork does pretty much what the name says. It is a WPS program that when run, will clean out the work folders of old and orphaned directories that are no longer used. WPS comes with a cleanwork program for Linux and Mac but not for Windows. The version written by MineQuest will run on Windows Workstations running Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 and 10. It will also run on Windows Servers such as Windows Server 2008, 2008 R2, 2012 and 2012 R2. Basically, it will run on all Windows Servers except 2003 and before. It also runs on all Windows Workstations except XP and before.

Cleanwork is packaged in a zip file that contains the source code, the Usage Document, License and a sample program. Cleanwork has been tested to execute only on the WPS platform.

If you are running WPS on a Windows Server you may want to set cleanwork to run on a schedule. This is a perfect utility to automate and run on a regular schedule. For busy server installations, I could see setting a scheduler to run cleanwork every few hours.

The zip file contains five files. These are:

clean.sas – a sample program for running the cleanwork utility.

cleanwork_source.sas – the actual source code that implements the utility.

CleanWorkUsage.docx – a Microsoft Word document that explain how to use cleanwork.

SASMACR.wpccat – a compiled version of the macro that  is ready to run.

license.txt – The license agreement for use of the source code and user document.

You can find the download by going to the bottom of the page here.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

 

 

 

Richmond, CA Hackathon – Meeting of the Minds

On the weekend of October 17-18th the Meeting of the Minds Civic Hackathon will take place in Richmond, California.  Amongst the various tools and facilities that will be available for the Hackathon, World Programming will be providing WPS software (www.teamwpc.co.uk/products/wps ) and support for any SAS programmers taking part in the event who would like to create and run programs in the language of SAS. The WPS software will be available on a server provided by Cisco and also for installation onto your own workstations running Linux, OS X or Windows.  Teams who use WPS software at this event will be given a license at no cost, and can use the product and all of its features for an additional 6 months after the event.

There will be data sets that can be used to create civic oriented applications and the data is categorized into Economic Development, Public Spaces, Health and Environment, Sustainability, Digital Divide and Education. So there is plenty of data available for a myriad of subject matter experts to use.

There is a $5,000 cash prize from Qualcomm awarded to the winner.

More information on the Hackathon can be found at: http://tinyurl.com/p6ymuot

 

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

Why WPS needs to be part of your Corporate BI Stack

Recently, I’ve been talking to a few customers about why they decided to bring WPS into the company. After all, these firms have lots of money and talent. They can pretty much license any software they feel they need as long as it gets the job done. Of course, there are constraints due to pricing and training, but for the most part, these companies have free reign.

Below are the four major topics that everyone has touched on. Remember, these are large firms that are stalwarts in the analytics field offering products and services that are dependent on their IT and business staffs to generate revenue.

Innovation

WPS is rapidly growing and introducing additional procedures to the product. The customers that I have spoken with have all stated that WPS contains all the PROCS that they need to access, analyze and report on the data. Remember, we are talking about Fortune 500 companies here so that says a lot about how fleshed out the product is at this point.

Efficiency in Licensing

If you are a large corporation, it is likely that you have offices overseas. Licensing WPS is a dream compared to our competitors. There’s no multiple sales teams to have to work with and no differentiated licensing.

Also mentioned was that ALL the library modules are included in the price. There is no longer any confusion on what is part of the product.

Cost Reductions

It’s well known that WPS is a high value low cost alternative to the SAS System. Whether considering expanding the footprint with workstations or servers, WPS is an extremely competitive proposition. This is especially true on the server side. Since WPS is priced so competitively, even small workgroups can easily afford a server for their department.

Sole Source provider

One of the most interesting responses I received, and one that caught my attention (especially from a risk mitigation perspective) was that they didn’t want to find themselves beholden to a single source supplier of the language. I asked why they were concerned about that issue specifically. The three major points brought up are:

  1. They lacked flexibility in how they could use the product to deliver data, analytics and reports to their customers.
  2. They could take advantage of new concepts and features as they are introduced across two platforms.
  3. Fear that they would be held hostage in pricing negotiations. With a multiple providers, they felt they had leverage if they chose to not expand their footprint with the sole source provider.

 

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

SAS Increases Prices for Workstation Product

Just noticed that SAS raised their prices for desktops. The 2014 price for a single workstation was $8700 for the first year and has increased to $9,000. This is for the Analytics Pro product and only available on Windows Workstations. Note that SAS does not sell workstation licenses for Apple’s OS X operating system because it doesn’t support OS X natively. SAS also increased the license fees for individual access engines from $3,000 to $3,100 USD.

The $9,000 price also does not include any Access Engines used to interface into databases such as Oracle, MySQL, DB2, etc…

The price increase is 3.44% and when you factor in annual inflation for 2014 (.76%) it seems rather odd that they would have an increase. Actually, by the time you get done adding two access engines (say ODBC and one other) you are looking at first year fees of $15,200. That’s a lot of money!

Our product pricing for 2015 for the WPS Workstation product here in the US has held steady. There are many reasons for this including currency issues and obtaining scales of economy are some of the reasons behind this. Remember, I’m only referring to US pricing.

If you are interested in what WPS has to offer in v3.1 on Windows and Mac Workstations, take a look at the document WPS for Workstations v3.1 to see what a bang for the buck that WPS is for any organization.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

Post Installation Steps for WPS Workstations

We recently wrote a short technical document on a set of post installation steps that MineQuest Business Analytics recommends after you install WPS on your workstation. We are often asked what needs to be done after WPS is installed to get the greatest performance out of WPS without too much hassle.

The document walks you through modifying your WPS configuration file, moving your work folder to another drive, why you want to install R (for using PROC R of course!), creating an autoexec.sas file, turning out write caching and a few other pointers. You don’t need to to all of the suggestions, after all they are just suggestions, but they are useful modifications that will enable you to get more out of WPS on your workstation.

You can find the document “Post Installation Steps for WPS Workstations” in the Papers Section of the MineQuest website.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

WPS for Workstations

In the last few weeks, we put together a document that describes the World Programming System for workstations and desktops. The document describes some of the licensing behind WPS and what procedures and database engines are supported.

If you are considering a WPS solution and want some detailed background on the product before purchasing a WPS Workstation license, this document should help.

You can download the Product Overview from our website by clicking the link below.

Product Overview – WPS for Workstations (1.02MB PDF)

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

Who says only big companies can afford to utilize Business Intelligence?

One of the reasons I got into reselling WPS was the fact (and it’s still a fact) that it’s very expensive for a new firm or startup to utilize SAS products. Actually, it’s prohibitively expensive. A commercial startup business is looking at $8700 for a desktop license that provides access to BASE, GRAPH and STAT. That $8700 is for the first year and it doesn’t include access to a database, Open Source R or reading and writing to desktop files like Excel and Access. Add those necessities in the price and you are looking at more than $15,000 for the first year and more than $4200 for renewal.

With WPS our pricing is different. We kind of joke that whatever SAS does pricing wise, we do just the opposite. We don’t have a high barrier in terms of cost to start using our products. Actually, we encourage you to use our products! Currently, we charge $1,311 for a single desktop license. That’s the cost for the first year and it includes all the database engines that you would want.

We don’t have a high barrier to using the language. If you are already familiar with the language of SAS, then you are ready to go with WPS.

We don’t have a high barrier when it comes to accessing your SAS data sets. We can read and write SAS data sets just fine.

But enough about barriers, let’s talk about servers.

The pricing differential is even greater when you start looking at servers. You can license a small WPS server for less than $5,700. That’s a two LCPU server and it includes all the bells and whistles that our desktop licenses include as well. Meaning it includes all the database access engines. The nice thing about our licensing is that we don’t have client license fees. Client license fees are fees that you pay to be able to access the server you just bought! It’s a stupid fee and we try not to do stupid things!

Another way we differ from our competitor is that we don’t have Data Service Provider fees. Let’s face it, many small companies (and large companies too) provide data and reports to their customers and vendors for further analysis and research. As a DSP, you will pay significantly more for your SAS license than what is listed. Expect to pay at least 30% more and often times, a lot more.

If you’re a startup, the message is clear. You probably don’t have a lot of money to toss around and cash flow is an issue. MineQuest has partnered with Balboa Capital to help company’s manage their licensing costs. By working with Balboa Capital, you can manage your license costs by paying a monthly amount of money towards your license. You will have to take out a two year WPS license to qualify for the program, but it’s an easy and efficient way to manage your resources.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.

High Performance Workstations for BI

There’s one thing I really enjoy and that’s powerful workstations for performing analytics. It’s fun to play around with and can be insightful to speculate on the design and then build a custom higher-end workstation for running BI applications like WPS and R.

ARS Builds

Every quarter, ARS Technica goes through an exercise where they build three PC’s mainly to assess gaming performance and then do a price vs. performance comparison. There’s a trend that you will soon see after reading a few of these quarterly builds and that is, the graphics card plays a major role in their performance assessment. The CPU, number of cores and fixed storage tend to be minimal when comparing the machines.

This if course will be in contrast to what we want to do for our performance benchmarks. We are looking at a holistic approach of CPU throughput, DISK I/O and graphics for getting the most for the dollar on a workstation build. But ARS does have a lot to recommend when it comes to benchmarking and I think it’s worthwhile including some of their ideas.

What Constitutes a High End Analytics Workstation?

This is an interesting question and one that I will throw out for debate. It’s so easy to get caught up in spending thousands of dollars, if not ten thousand dollars (see the next section) for a work station. One thing that even the casual observer will soon notice is that being on the bleeding edge is a very expensive proposition. It’s an old adage that you are only as good as your tools. There’s also the adage that it’s a poor craftsman that blames his tools. In the BI world, especially when speed means success, it’s important to have good tools.

As a basis for what constitutes a high end workstation, I will offer the following as a point of entry.

  • At least 4 Logical CPU’s.
  • At least 8GB of RAM, preferably 16GB to 32GB.
  • Multiple hard drives for OS, temporary workspace and permanent data set storage.
  • A graphics card that can be used for more than displaying graphics, i.e. parallel computing.
  • A large display – 24” capable of at least 1920×1080.

As a mid-tier solution, I would think that a workstation comprised of the following components would be ideal.

  • At least 8 Logical CPU’s.
  • A minimum of 16GB of RAM.
  • Multiple hard drives for OS, temporary workspace and permanent data set storage with emphasis on RAID storage solutions and SSD Caching.
  • A graphics card that can be used for more than displaying graphics, i.e. parallel computing.
  • A large display – 24” capable of at least 1920×1080.

As a high end solution, I would think that a workstation built with the following hardware would be close to ultimate for many (if not most) analysts.

  • Eight to 16 Logical CPU’s – Xeon Class (or possible step down to an Intel I7).
  • A minimum of 32GB of RAM and up to 64GB.
  • Multiple hard drives for OS, temporary workspace and permanent data set storage with emphasis on RAID storage solutions and SSD Caching.
  • A graphics card that can be used for more than displaying graphics, i.e. parallel computing.
  • Multiple 24” displays capable of at least 1920×1200 each.

I do have a bias towards hardware that is upgradeable. All-in-one solutions tend to be one shot deals and thus expensive. I like upgradability for graphics cards, memory, hard drives and even CPU’s. Expandability can save you thousands of dollars over a period of a few years.

The New Mac Pro – a Game Changer?

The new Mac Pro is pretty radical from a number of perspectives. It’s obviously built for video editing but its small size is radical in my opinion. As a Business Analytics computer it offers some intriguing prospects. You have multiple cores, lots of RAM, high end graphics but limited internal storage. That’s the main criticism that I have about the new Mac Pro. The base machine comes with 256GB of storage and that’s not much for handling large data sets. You are forced to go to external storage solutions to be able to process large data sets. Although I’ve not priced out the cost of adding external storage, I’m sure it’s not inexpensive.

Benchmarks

This is a tough one for me because so many organizations have such an array of hardware and some benchmarks are going to require hardware that has specific capabilities. For example, Graphics Cards that are CUDA enabled to do parallel processing in R. Or the fact that we use the Bridge to R for invoking R code and the Bridge to R only runs on WPS (and not SAS).

I did write a benchmark a while ago that I like a lot. It provides information on the hardware platform (i.e. amount of memory and the number of LCPU’s available) and just runs the basic suite of PROCS that I know is available in both WPS and SAS. Moving to more statistically oriented PROC’s such as Logistic and GLM may be difficult because SAS license holders may not have the statistical libraries necessary to run the tests. That’s a major drawback to licensing the SAS System. You are nickel and dimed to death all the time. The alternative to this is to have a Workstation benchmark that is specific to WPS.

Perhaps the benchmark can be written where it tests if certain PROCS and Libraries are available and also determine if the hardware required is present (such as CUDA processors) to run that specific benchmark. Really, the idea is to determine the performance of the specific software for a specific set of hardware and not a comparison between R, WPS and SAS.

Price and Performance Metrics

One aspect of ARS that I really like is when they do their benchmarks, they calculate out the cost comparison for each build. They often base this on hardware pricing at the time of the benchmark. What they don’t do is price in the cost of the software for such things as video editing, etc… I think it’s important to show the cost with both hardware and software as a performance metric benchmark.

Moving Forward

I’m going to take some time and modify the WPS Workstation Benchmark Program that I wrote so that it doesn’t spew out so much unnecessary output into the listing window. I would like it to just show the output from the benchmark report. I think it would also be prudent to see if some R code could be included in the benchmark and compare and contrast the performance if there are some CUDA cores available for assisting in the computations.

About the author: Phil Rack is President of MineQuest Business Analytics, LLC located in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Phil has been a SAS language developer for more than 25 years. MineQuest provides WPS and SAS consulting and contract programming services and is a authorized reseller of WPS in North America.